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[personal profile] froodle
Eerie has it’s fair share of great places to eat. There’s the Eerie Baitshop and Sushi Bar, the Eerie Bus Terminal and Supper Club, Everything Corn, Grandma’s Kitchen, the Dragon of the Black Pool Restaurant and, of course, the ice-cream counter at the World o’ Stuff.

If you’re more of a homebody, maybe you prefer twenty-year-old bologna sandwiches or buckwheat pancakes made from a ForeverWare recipe. Perhaps a celebrity couple called off their wedding a few days before your birthday and you bought their cake on sale, or you just like adding the prefix “Swedish” to everything you cook, Marilyn Teller-style.

Maybe you really enjoy toast made in a haunted toaster, or maybe you hate it whether or not it comes with bank-robbing ghosts. You could be a member of a corn-worshipping cult whose banquets consist of Cornade (or Cornade Lite), huge bowls of fresh-made popcorn and, of course, hot buttered corn on the cob.

Is your favourite snack a jumbo-sized bag of chocolate milk balls (“the balls that go moo!”) or just a carton of the Eerie Dairy’s finest scavenged from the site of another fatal milk-truck accident? Do you feast on a giant plate of ribs the night before a human sacrifice or serve up a portion of space noodles and moon sauce while you search for UFOs?

Whatever your preferences, it’s the tenth of the month, and that means it’s time for our Foods of Eerie Fest. Are you enjoying a refreshing Black Cow after a long day investigating haunted structures, or baking cupcakes decorated with ravens and eyeballs? Share your recipes, post your pics, get out those Eerie-themed travel mugs and head off for a picnic in some ill-advised supernatural hotspot. Eat something spookily delicious and tell us all about it!
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[personal profile] froodle
Eerie has it’s fair share of great places to eat. There’s the Eerie Baitshop and Sushi Bar, the Eerie Bus Terminal and Supper Club, Everything Corn, Grandma’s Kitchen, the Dragon of the Black Pool Restaurant and, of course, the ice-cream counter at the World o’ Stuff.

If you’re more of a homebody, maybe you prefer twenty-year-old bologna sandwiches or buckwheat pancakes made from a ForeverWare recipe. Perhaps a celebrity couple called off their wedding a few days before your birthday and you bought their cake on sale, or you just like adding the prefix “Swedish” to everything you cook, Marilyn Teller-style.

Maybe you really enjoy toast made in a haunted toaster, or maybe you hate it whether or not it comes with bank-robbing ghosts. You could be a member of a corn-worshipping cult whose banquets consist of Cornade (or Cornade Lite), huge bowls of fresh-made popcorn and, of course, hot buttered corn on the cob.

Is your favourite snack a jumbo-sized bag of chocolate milk balls (“the balls that go moo!”) or just a carton of the Eerie Dairy’s finest scavenged from the site of another fatal milk-truck accident? Do you feast on a giant plate of ribs the night before a human sacrifice or serve up a portion of space noodles and moon sauce while you search for UFOs?

Whatever your preferences, it’s the tenth of the month, and that means it’s time for our Foods of Eerie Fest. Are you enjoying a refreshing Black Cow after a long day investigating haunted structures, or baking cupcakes decorated with ravens and eyeballs? Share your recipes, post your pics, get out those Eerie-themed travel mugs and head off for a picnic in some ill-advised supernatural hotspot. Eat something spookily delicious and tell us all about it!
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[personal profile] froodle
Well what do you know? As it turns out, the writers of “Eerie” didn't get out all that they had to say about death in the last episode, and have turned around immediately to tackle the subject head-on yet again.

If you're so cold and heartless that you can't give the show anything else, you at least have to admire it for the casting choices: It seems the special guest from every episode has gone on to do some pretty big things in Hollywood. For example, Danielle Harris, from the last episode, would go on to become popular for her voice role on the Wild Thornberry's, as well as her live-action roles in Rob Zombie's Halloween remakes. Here, we have a young Tobey Maguire—who looks eerily like current Tobey Maguire—playing the role of a ghost.

That ghost is Tripp McConnell, and he is awakened when Marshall finds an old letter in a book at the local bookstore. After the initial shock of finding a man from the 1930s hanging around the bookshelves wears off, Marshall picks up on what Tripp is trying to urge him to do: Deliver the letter to its intended recipient.

You see, Tripp was deeply, madly in love with one Mary Carter 62 years ago, and they were certain to be wed. But then Tripp got some cold feet and left Mary out in the cold, something she has never forgotten, or forgiven, all these years later. But that can be the problem with life: not everything is always as it seems. In this case, the only thing Tripp did wrong was get killed, and that’s what prevented him from marrying his childhood sweetheart, something she has been oblivious to for all the prevailing years.

Since Marshall was the one that discovered the letter, then Marshall is the one that is required to deliver it to Mary Carter in this current day and age, 62 years later. He refuses quite a few times, finding Tripp to be a rather annoying chap, at which point Tripp has to rely on his ghostly cunning to get him to change his mind: He wins over the Teller family with his ghostly charm, earning an invite to stay for dinner. Marshall isn’t too keen on seeing this happen, so he reluctantly agrees to help him, on the grounds that he leaves him alone afterwards.

Thankfully, the myriad of possible pitfalls that one could face when searching for a person after six decades, are all conveniently avoided: Mary still lives at the exact same address as she did all those years ago, with her granddaughter, who happens to be Marshall's age. At first Mary thinks Marshall is lying, until she reads the letter, and then learns the truth about Tripp's fate.

The ending of this one is actually pretty similar to “Heart on a Chain”, now that I think about it, with the two lovers reunited in the afterlife, something we can see coming from the outset (though it's not as creepy as it sounds, as Tripp sees Mary the way she was when they were together, as opposed to the old decaying hag that she has become). This one is a little less devastating, simply because we’re dealing with an old woman versus a young one (and old women are always considered expendable in today’s society), but it’s still a pretty hefty emotional saga for a young adult to sit through. Nevertheless, with two themes so closely intertwined to one another, I think it would have made more sense to space those two apart a few episodes, rather than have them be back-to-back installments.

Also a little bizarre is Marshall's initial refusal to have anything to do with Tripp. Here is a kid that goes out of his way to investigate weird goings-on in Eerie, and so for him to get offended by Tripp's simple request, simply because he “feels like” he's trouble, just seems out of character, especially since Tripp does nothing to garner such feelings. Sure, he comes off as rather arrogant in their first meeting, but isn't rude or offensive in any specific way. Just a weird way for a “hardened” investigator of the macabre to act.

When the dust settles, this is a pretty decent episode, but by leaning heavily on many of the same themes that the previous episode dealt with does it no favors.

EPISODE RATING: 6/10
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[personal profile] froodle
When I read a brief synopsis for the seventh episode of “Eerie, Indiana”, I was intrigued. It’s not every day that you find a show geared toward young adults (and, perhaps arguably, even younger than that) willing to tackle the subject of death at all; it’s even less common to see a show do it in such a frank, straightforward way. I was finally starting to appreciate the town of Eerie and its characters, but this wallop of an episode helps to prove just how daring this show really was, at least in terms of its intended age group. Its characters aren’t mindless caricatures quickly thrown together for the sake of ratings, but rather fully realized people. Even the adults in this show, such as Marshall’s family members, who are usually made stupid in shows so that the younger characters—the ones audience members would be most likely to relate to—can be intellectually superior, are immediately likable, and always encouraging to their son's interests, no matter how weird or “out there” they may be.

In this one, there’s a new girl in town, and both Marshall, and his friend Devon Wilde, are immediately smitten with her. She is Melanie, but she is no ordinary girl: she has a weak heart, and is on a list to receive a transplant that can elongate her life. Unfazed by this development, the two kids engage in friendly competitions, each one trying to impress her more so that they win her fragile heart; it’s Devon’s wild-child persona, vs. Marshall’s good-guy routine, and just like in real-life, it’s obvious which one she favors, and it ain’t Marshall.

Then Devon is struck and killed while carelessly riding his skateboard in the middle of the street.

One thing that sets this apart from similar shows of its ilk is the relationship between Devon and Marshall. While they both are fighting for the same goal, they still put their own friendship above all else: Devon even asks Marshall if he minds if he asks Melanie to the school dance, and Marshall puts aside his own feelings to let it happen; Marshall is upset when a careless Devon nearly gets run over by the same milk truck that finishes him off a little while later. It never devolves into a mean-spirited rivalry, which is the standard story arc that these stories lead to, and it's refreshing that “Eerie, Indiana” doesn't sinks into that same level of tired mediocrity.

After Marshall learns that Devon was struck by a truck, he rushes to the hospital, where he meets Melanie, who informs him they found a heart for her. At that precise moment, Marshall puts two and two together, and figures out that Devon has passed on, and it is his heart that will be implanted inside her. It's pretty heavy stuff so far (oh, it gets even stronger), but nice to see a television show that doesn't assume its audience is comprised of idiots that need everything spoonfed to them, so I can definitely appreciate the strong subject matter.

Anyway, after she receives the heart, Marshall notices that her personality changes. She's no longer a shy, innocent girl, but a daredevil who takes chances and whose favorite line is: “Live fast, die young, and leave a good-looking corpse”...which happened to be Devon's favorite quote! Marshall doesn't like this change, and urges her to let him go and move on. He assures her that everyone is sad he's gone, especially him since he was one of his best friends, but that life doesn't wait and it's the only thing she can do. She reluctantly agrees to try to do so by kissing him...only to have her heart malfunction. It's just a minor glitch—the moment they pull away everything returns to normal—but it's enough to cause alarm. Is Devon controlling her from beyond? In the end, Melanie agrees to let Devon go, but tells Marshall she isn't ready to be in a relationship so soon, and they part ways, with Marshall joining Simon and Melanie going her own separate way.

[SPOILER ALERT]
But as sad as this episode already is, it’s about to become emotionally shattering: As Simon and Marshall happily make their way for the cemetery exit, we see a figure walking slowly in the background, heading toward an off-screen Melanie. After a little bit of squinting, I realized it’s the FUCKING GRIM REAPER. Then, a light shines on the angel on Devon’s gravestone, complete with the heart pendant that Devon got for her, at which point a lone tear drips down, indicating that he is claiming her so that no one else can have her. Holy shit.
[END SPOILER ALERT]

This is about as perfect as a thirty-minute episode of young adult/children's TV can be, with heavy subject matter handled with maturity and an uncommon straightforwardness that flies in the face of the bland watered-down sameness of many such shows, even today. The way the Tellers handle Marshall's new “girlfriend” the few times she is over, is so adorable, you just can't help but fall in love with them. I know early on in the season I mentioned that Marshall and Simon are completely boring and don't have the kinds of personalities that make good leads in a show, but it is these exact traits that have actually made me completely change my mind: They are you and me. They are everyday children with wild imaginations and big dreams, kids with big hearts and a loving family (well, not in Simon's case, but the Tellers frequently take him in as their own).

This show has slowly been growing on me, and I was beginning to realize its potential; not even I could have realized the near-perfection that it was capable of when everything came together in harmony. This is a devastating, must-see episode, and the pinnacle of what "Eerie Indiana" had to offer.

SIDE NOTE: After harping on how weak Joe Dante-directed episodes were compared to others, I have to immediately take that back, as he was the director of this one. It's not just the pinnacle of the series, but might be the pinnacle of his career.

EPISODE RATING: 10/10
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[personal profile] froodle
The beginning of “Just Say No Fun” perfectly exemplifies what makes “Eerie, Indiana” such an engaging, charming show: Marshall and Simon play a prank on their father, in which they rig a little critter to pop out of their dad's cereal, which is triggered by a switch they hide under his chair cushion. In many other kid's shows, the kids would find themselves in trouble for simply being kids and trying to have fun: here, the dad encourages them to do the same thing to their mother, then their sister, each victim in turn becoming an active participant in the ensuing person's lighthearted humiliation.

And that sums up the appeal of the series all in one simple scene. It is also the perfect example of what makes a television show geared toward younger viewers work so well: if it can bring back nostalgic memories of my childhood--not necessarily through specific scenes, but just by having a similar freewheeling sense of carelessness and fun—then it's instantly a winner in my book. Too many kids' series try to paint the family dynamic as “children vs. adults”, where only one side can win. But “Eerie” was always much smarter than that: the parents always encouraged their child to be a child. Of course, they were willing to reprimand him if he went too far, but they never wanted to punish him simply for trying to experiment or even for allowing his imagination to run wild...after all, isn't that what being a kid is all about?

It's not all fun and games though, because this introductory scene also shows us what's at stake in this episode. After pranking his family in the first scene, Marshall and Simon head to school with a pack of gag gum, looking to extend their mischievous mood to fellow classmates. But this plan gets derailed when a bully steals the gum, pops a piece in his mouth, then spits the smoking, smoldering piece back on the ground. As he goes to confront Marshall and Simon (who, in their defense, weren't intending to make him the victim), their verbal exchange is interrupted by the principal, who curiously sends them to the nurse's office for an eye exam. Huh?

It quickly becomes apparent why: All of the students that exit the nurse's office wear thick-rimmed glasses, but act as if they've been lobotomized, becoming study-obsessed kids with no room for fun in their lives. And it's not just the troublemakers that are being sent there...all the students, and even the faculty, are required to make an appointment with Nurse Nancy, a woman who has “tamed” many schools before. Simon is the first of our heroes to visit the “nurse”, while Marshall thankfully escapes. Can Marshall reverse the effects for not just his buddy, but the entire school? Or will Nurse Nancy's influence spread through the entire town?

Overall, this is a pretty good episode that deals with themes that just about every kids show tackle (the “blend in with everyone else or be yourself” conundrum), but this one has the benefit of above-average insight and writing. Once again, this can be summed up in one exchange: As Marshall is going to a visit with Nurse Nancy (where once again the parents don't believe Marshall's assurance that she's trying to brainwash him), his father says, “Why can't you be like the other students?” to which Marilyn replies, “Well maybe he shouldn't. Maybe he should just be himself.” It's a rather corny line, but the actors—who have always been above-average for a show aimed toward younger crowds—make it a convincing rallying cry that you can hang the entire episode around.

The end is a little too goofy for my tastes, but is probably one of the few moments in the entire series where it goes overboard enough to truly appeal to its target demographic. In other words, most kids will revel in the stupidity of it all. I can appreciate what it was trying to do, but it just didn't do anything for me (although the final line did bring a little smirk to my face). Still, the rest of the episode is interesting—and thanks to the glimpses we get of Nurse Nancy's “eye testing” machine, trippy—enough to interest a wide variety of ages. It doesn't end on a great note, but there are at least enough notes hit to make for a good episode.

EPISODE RATING: 6/10
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[personal profile] deifire
I'm not sure if this is just a ficlet or eventually going to wind up being part of something larger, but here's a little bit of Tod and Dash just in time for World Goth Day.

Rating: G (there's some implied swearing)

Tod had probably never said more than eleven words total directly to Dash... )

PS: For some reason DW is giving me errors when I try to tag, so apologies for those not being here.
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[personal profile] froodle
Eerie has it’s fair share of great places to eat. There’s the Eerie Baitshop and Sushi Bar, the Eerie Bus Terminal and Supper Club, Everything Corn, Grandma’s Kitchen, the Dragon of the Black Pool Restaurant and, of course, the ice-cream counter at the World o’ Stuff.

If you’re more of a homebody, maybe you prefer twenty-year-old bologna sandwiches or buckwheat pancakes made from a ForeverWare recipe. Perhaps a celebrity couple called off their wedding a few days before your birthday and you bought their cake on sale, or you just like adding the prefix “Swedish” to everything you cook, Marilyn Teller-style.

Maybe you really enjoy toast made in a haunted toaster, or maybe you hate it whether or not it comes with bank-robbing ghosts. You could be a member of a corn-worshipping cult whose banquets consist of Cornade (or Cornade Lite), huge bowls of fresh-made popcorn and, of course, hot buttered corn on the cob.

Is your favourite snack a jumbo-sized bag of chocolate milk balls (“the balls that go moo!”) or just a carton of the Eerie Dairy’s finest scavenged from the site of another fatal milk-truck accident? Do you feast on a giant plate of ribs the night before a human sacrifice or serve up a portion of space noodles and moon sauce while you search for UFOs?

Whatever your preferences, it’s the tenth of the month, and that means it’s time for our Foods of Eerie Fest. Are you enjoying a refreshing Black Cow after a long day investigating haunted structures, or baking cupcakes decorated with ravens and eyeballs? Share your recipes, post your pics, get out those Eerie-themed travel mugs and head off for a picnic in some ill-advised supernatural hotspot. Eat something spookily delicious and tell us all about it!
froodle: (Default)
[personal profile] froodle
Eerie has it’s fair share of great places to eat. There’s the Eerie Baitshop and Sushi Bar, the Eerie Bus Terminal and Supper Club, Everything Corn, Grandma’s Kitchen, the Dragon of the Black Pool Restaurant and, of course, the ice-cream counter at the World o’ Stuff.

If you’re more of a homebody, maybe you prefer twenty-year-old bologna sandwiches or buckwheat pancakes made from a ForeverWare recipe. Perhaps a celebrity couple called off their wedding a few days before your birthday and you bought their cake on sale, or you just like adding the prefix “Swedish” to everything you cook, Marilyn Teller-style.

Maybe you really enjoy toast made in a haunted toaster, or maybe you hate it whether or not it comes with bank-robbing ghosts. You could be a member of a corn-worshipping cult whose banquets consist of Cornade (or Cornade Lite), huge bowls of fresh-made popcorn and, of course, hot buttered corn on the cob.

Is your favourite snack a jumbo-sized bag of chocolate milk balls (“the balls that go moo!”) or just a carton of the Eerie Dairy’s finest scavenged from the site of another fatal milk-truck accident? Do you feast on a giant plate of ribs the night before a human sacrifice or serve up a portion of space noodles and moon sauce while you search for UFOs?

Whatever your preferences, it’s the tenth of the month, and that means it’s time for our Foods of Eerie Fest. Are you enjoying a refreshing Black Cow after a long day investigating haunted structures, or baking cupcakes decorated with ravens and eyeballs? Share your recipes, post your pics, get out those Eerie-themed travel mugs and head off for a picnic in some ill-advised supernatural hotspot. Eat something spookily delicious and tell us all about it!
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[personal profile] froodle
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[personal profile] froodle
Eerie, Indiana – tape 1548

I don’t think I’ve watched Eerie, Indiana before, but it’s executive producer is Joe Dante, so I’m hoping it’ll be fun.

In the first episode, our young heroes find an old letter in an old book, open it, and awakens Tobey Maguire from the past.

Marshall’s family love Maguire when he turns up, and they’re upset when Marshall banishes him from the house.

There’s a trippy dream sequence.

Maguire asks Marshall to deliver the letter, one he failed to deliver years before, to the love of his life, and there’s a happy ending when they manage to find her.

In the next episode, Marshall meets a girl called Sara Bob, who has a lot of very unruly brothers.

She’s an artist, and things she draws become real. He’s just had his bike stolen, so she draws it, and it’s back outside the store they’re in.

I’m enjoying the little touches, like the police patrol car with far too many aerials on the roof.

This one almost has a quite melancholy ending. And the credits play on the family all being called Something-Bob.

Next episode has Marshall annoyed that Indiana doesn’t have daylight saving time, so he sets his watch back, stranding him an hour before the rest of the town.

He’s rescued from the evil garbagemen who are cleaning up the town, by an old milkman, and he ends up on a milk carton in the regular time.

In the next episode, there’s a new museum in town, dedicated to Eerie’s weirdness, but the mayor, Gregory Itzin, doesn’t like it.

Next we meet Matt Frewer as a Tornado chaser who believes Tornados are alive.

We also learn that Eerie’s sister town is Normal, Illinois.

In the next episode, the owner of the World of Stuff (Archie Hahn) is revealed as an imposter, and the real owner is restored, played by John Astin. I wonder if they just felt like recasting a recurring character, and came up with an Eerie, Indiana way to do it.

In the last episode, every year the town picks a Harvest King, and the honour includes being fed to a werewolf.

What a great little show this is.

After this, recording stops, and underneath there’s a short segment of a German gameshow called Riskier Was which looks like it was a version of the US show Wipeout. Recording stops after a minute or so of this.
froodle: (Default)
[personal profile] froodle
Eerie has it’s fair share of great places to eat. There’s the Eerie Baitshop and Sushi Bar, the Eerie Bus Terminal and Supper Club, Everything Corn, Grandma’s Kitchen, the Dragon of the Black Pool Restaurant and, of course, the ice-cream counter at the World o’ Stuff.

If you’re more of a homebody, maybe you prefer twenty-year-old bologna sandwiches or buckwheat pancakes made from a ForeverWare recipe. Perhaps a celebrity couple called off their wedding a few days before your birthday and you bought their cake on sale, or you just like adding the prefix “Swedish” to everything you cook, Marilyn Teller-style.

Maybe you really enjoy toast made in a haunted toaster, or maybe you hate it whether or not it comes with bank-robbing ghosts. You could be a member of a corn-worshipping cult whose banquets consist of Cornade (or Cornade Lite), huge bowls of fresh-made popcorn and, of course, hot buttered corn on the cob.

Is your favourite snack a jumbo-sized bag of chocolate milk balls (“the balls that go moo!”) or just a carton of the Eerie Dairy’s finest scavenged from the site of another fatal milk-truck accident? Do you feast on a giant plate of ribs the night before a human sacrifice or serve up a portion of space noodles and moon sauce while you search for UFOs?

Whatever your preferences, it’s the tenth of the month, and that means it’s time for our Foods of Eerie Fest. Are you enjoying a refreshing Black Cow after a long day investigating haunted structures, or baking cupcakes decorated with ravens and eyeballs? Share your recipes, post your pics, get out those Eerie-themed travel mugs and head off for a picnic in some ill-advised supernatural hotspot. Eat something spookily delicious and tell us all about it!

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Eerie Indiana

July 2017

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